My Children, the girls

I have four daughters.  Each one is a credit to the family.  Their father is a very proud Papa of them.  Each day before breakfast when he is home he goes and collects roses in the garden and places a flower next to the place of each girl in the family.  The largest bloom he places at my seat and then the second largest goes to the eldest daughter and the small bud goes to the youngest.  In this sweet way he lets them know that he loves them.  My husband is one of the best men that I know.  He loves us so much and I know that the time he spends away from us is just as painful for him as it is for us.  Fortunately there has been a lively correspondence between the entire family when we are separated.

With the current unrest escalating as a mother I fear for my daughters.  They are all young and I do not want their life to be more complicated than life can be.  I hope God will grant this mother’s prays for her daughters.

My eldest daughter Mary Custis Lee and was a strong willed girl, and is now a strong willed woman.  She was my second child born in 1835 and is now 26; within the family circle we call her Daughter.  Her birth was very difficult on me.  Thank the Lord I was at home and my mother was able to help me.  After Mary was born I had to take to bed for several months and still many years later I am not myself.  Mary likes to travel and will be away from home for weeks on end.  As the oldest of my four girls Mary has been lucky enought to have her own bed chamber although sometimes I wonder if her sisters would want to share a room with her.  She does have a tendancy to do as she pleases.  I do not know what will happen to her should there be war.  She would not be happy having to stay in one place and I would fear for her saftey if she continued to travel.  What would happen is she were to be caught on enemy ground?  Though I love her very much sometimes I feel she can be a most trying child to me.

My second daughter, Anne Carter Lee (Annie as we call her), was born in 1839.  She is now 22 and a lovely young lady.  When she was born she had a red colored birthmark on her face, her father called her Little Raspberry because of it.  Her birth was much easier than Mary’s – truly a blessing.  Alas as small children are wont to do her little hands found a pair of scissors and pierced her right eye.  She was blinded and forever has a scar.  At so young an age my little girl was so burdened.   It is difficult to write of Annie without also writing of my next child and third daughter, Eleanor Agnes Lee.  Agnes (her family pet name) was born in 1841 only 20 months after Annie and the two became fast friends.  She is now 20.  It seemed, and still does, that the two are not often apart.  To us, the family, they became known as the girls.  They even share the same room.  When Agnes arrived her Papa said that he could have dispensed with her for a year or two more.  However, she was in such haste to greet him, he is now very glad to see her.  And I have to admit I felt the same.  With war looming I am nervous for both my girls.  Annie is a bit frail and I do now know what will become of her.  Agnes has a beau and he is with the United States military.  What will she do if he ends up opposing the side her family is on?  What if he is, God forbid, killed in battle?  My heart breaks for my children to have to grow in a time made so difficult.  How this country could some so far from the teachings and beliefs of George Washington is unbearable.  I pray with all my heart everyday that the world will right itself and all will be calm.

My youngest daughter, Mildred Childe Lee, born in 1846 is now 15.  In the family we call her Precious Life because she brings joy into any room she is in.  She is a sweet girl and growing so fast.  I must admit that my faults as a parent have done the most harm to Precious Life.  Sometimes her behavior is most improper and her doting father does not help either.  When she was younger I felt how much to blame I am for permitting her behavior and hoped God would be merciful to her & change her heart before Satan has taken possession of it.  She has not yet devoted herself to God and I worry  about her soul.  She is a very active child and speaks out some.  As she has grown I believe her good nature has come through and that her father and I have not let her stray from God’s path.  I do not believe that Precious Life understands what is happening in the country right now.  I write to her at school and she writes back concerning her wardrobe.  With her reaching maturity as this conflict escalates I fear for what will become of her life.  I would like to see her happy in life but should war happen I do not know if happiness is in God’s plan. 

Now that their father has resigned from the United States military I fear for my daughters future even more.  I can only hope that God will guide them and that they will feel His embrace forever.

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Filed under Civil War, Family Life, Women's History

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